Prairie State Wire

Prairie State Wire

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Dodge calls tax hikes 'policy of last resort'

Politics

By Glenn Minnis | Jul 11, 2018

Dodge
Jim Dodge

Republican State Treasurer candidate Jim Dodge points to talk of a progressive tax system as another example of just how upside down things have now become in Springfield.

“The decision to ask taxpayers to give up more of their hard earned money should always be the policy of last resort,” Dodge told the Prairie State Wire. “Unfortunately, Springfield believes the answer is always to raise taxes. Instead of asking taxpayers to do more, we should ask the government to govern smarter, and to make sure existing taxpayer dollars are spent and invested in the most efficient way possible.”

Lawmakers are still keen to pass a progressive-tax constitutional amendment despite failing to get one to the governor’s desk earlier this year, according to the Illinois Policy Institute (IPI). House Resolution 1025, a non-binding endorsement of a graduated tax rate was filed by House Speaker Mike Madigan (D-Chicago) and passed in May.

Although HR 1025 states that representatives “stand united in support of a fair and progressive income tax that must reduce taxes on low and middle-income families while raising taxes on the wealthiest Illinoisans,” the earlier bill — HB 3255, also known as the Friendly Act — would raise taxes on Illinoisans making as little as $17,300 a year, according to IPI.

The institute also notes that the Friendly Act would also raise tax rates in the district of every lawmaker who voted in favor of HR 1025.

“The people of Illinois know that taxes are already too high and they see this proposal for what it is, just another tax hike in disguise,” said Dodge. “A progressive income tax favored, by the left and the Democrat legislative leadership, is not what Illinois needs. It would accelerate the doom loop, which has been brought on as a result of decades of bad financial decisions by the political class in Springfield.”

The median household in all 118 Illinois House districts would see their income tax bill rise under the Friendly Act, in some cases by as much as 22 percent, according to IPI.

“We need new thinking,” Dodge said. “This election is about who will speak for the taxpayers in Springfield. Right now, the special interests are well represented in Springfield, but the taxpayer is not, which is why the political class is constantly finding ways to take more and more money from the working families of Illinois to benefit the special interests. People of all income levels are hurt by decades of bad decision making. The future of Illinois is on the line here.”

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